Honors Course Offerings

Please go to the class schedule website for days and times.

Unless otherwise noted, Honors sections are open to current members of the Honors College.

Winter 2020

CRN DEPT COURSE TITLE
28603 ANT 3410 Global Health-HONORS
Lecture
21405 ANT 4999 Honors Research and Thesis
Individual
29014 AH 1110 Srvy:Ancient-Medieval-Honors
Lecture
29013 AH 1120 Srvy:Renaisce-Modern-Honors
Lecture
29192 AH 1130 Arts:Global Africa-Honors
Lecture
22527 ACS 5996 Honors Project
Individual
23998 BE 2100 Basic Engg 3:Problty&Stats-HON
Lecture
25463 BE 2100 Basic Engg 3:Problty&Stats-HON
Laboratory
21448 BE 5998 Engineering Honors Thesis
Individual
20265 BIO 1030 Biol Today-Honors
Lecture
22627 BIO 1500 Basic Life Diversty-Honors
Lecture
21573 BIO 1500 Basic Life Diversty-Honors
Laboratory
26235 BIO 2200 Intro Microbio-HONORS
Lecture
21604 BIO 2200 Intro Microbio-HONORS
Laboratory
22478 BIO 2600 Intr To Cell Biolgy-Honors
Lecture
21764 BIO 3070 Genetics-Honors
Lecture
21765 BIO 3070 Genetics-Honors
Laboratory
22479 BIO 3100 Cellular Biochem-Honors
Lecture
22523 BIO 3200 Human Physiology-Honors
Lecture
22524 BIO 4200 Evolution-Honors
Lecture
22480 BIO 5620 Developmental Bio-Honors
Lecture
21293 BIO 6990 Honors Directed Study in Biology
Individual
22048 BIO 6990 Honors Directed Study in Biology
Individual
20748 BIO 6999 Terminal Essay: Honors
Individual
23853 BME 4920 BME Capstone Design 2 - Honors
Combined Lab/Lecture
24210 CHM 1220 Genl Chm 1 - Honors
Lecture
23309 CHM 1220 Genl Chm 1-Honors
Discussion
22919 CHM 1240 Organic Chem 1-Honors
Lecture
22920 CHM 1240 Organic Chem 1-Honors
Discussion
28725 CHM 1240 Organic Chem 1-Honors
Lecture
28727 CHM 1240 Organic Chem 1-Honors
Discussion
24225 CHM 2220 Organic Chemistry 2 - Honors
Lecture
24227 CHM 2220 Organic Chemistry 2 - Honors
Discussion
28448 CHM 2220 Organic Chemistry 2-Honors
Lecture
28450 CHM 2220 Organic Chemistry 2-HONORS
Discussion
28433 CHM 2280 GenChm 2/Analytical Chm-Honors
Lecture
20816 CHM 2999 Honors Research Problems in Chemistry
Individual
28434 CHM 3020 Intm Inorg Chm 1-Honors
Lecture
28435 CHM 5600 Survey: Biochemistry-Honors
Lecture
20913 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28671 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28672 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28673 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28674 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28675 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28676 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28677 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28678 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28679 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28681 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28682 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28683 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28684 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28686 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28687 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28688 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28689 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28690 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28691 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28692 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28693 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28694 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28698 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28700 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28701 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28702 CHM 5998 Honors Thesis Research in Chemistry
Individual
28586 CLA 1010 Classical Civilization-Honors
Lecture
23591 CLA 4998 Honor's Thesis
Individual
21168 COM 1010 Oral Cmucn:Basc - Honors
Lecture
20955 CSC 4999 Honors Thesis
Individual
20258 CRJ 4998 Honors Thesis in Criminal Justice
Individual
24156 DNC 5997 Departmental Honors Thesis
Individual
20751 ECO 4997 Senior Honors Smr
Individual
24188 ENG 3020 Writing & Community-HONORS
Lecture
25781 ENG 3020 Writing & Community-HONORS
Lecture
20061 ENG 4990 Directed Study: Honors Program
Individual
23329 ENG 4991 Honors Seminar
Seminar
21292 ENG 4991 Honors Seminar
Seminar
23303 ENG 4992 Honors Project
Individual
25447 GSW 5990 Sr Proj Seminar-Honors
Individual
29032 GPH 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-HONORS
Lecture
29081 GPH 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-Honors
Lecture
25242 GEL 4998 Honors Thesis
Individual
29029 HIS 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-HONORS
Lecture
29079 HIS 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-Honors
Lecture
20867 HIS 5995 Honors Seminar
Individual
28875 HON 2000 FS: Doing Well & Doing Good
Lecture
28876 HON 2000 FS: Disagreement in Detroit
Lecture
28877 HON 2000 FS: Food in America
Lecture
28878 HON 2000 FS: Race & Sports in US
Lecture
28879 HON 2000 FS: What Plagues Detroit
Lecture
28880 HON 2000 FS: Race & Sports in the US
Lecture
28881 HON 2000 FS: Disagreement in Detroit
Lecture
28882 HON 2000 FS: Pop Goes the World
Lecture
28883 HON 2000 FS: Pop Goes the World
Lecture
28884 HON 2000 FS: Gangs & Organized Crime
Lecture
28885 HON 2000 FS: Crime & Media
Lecture
28886 HON 2000 FS: What Plagues Detroit
Lecture
22293 HON 3000 Field Learning
Individual
28397 HON 4250 Smr: Citizenship
Lecture
28402 HON 4250 Smr:Jews,Christians&Muslims
Lecture
28934 HON 4250 Smr: Technology Cultures
Lecture
29017 HON 4250 Smr:Impeachment in Am Politics
Lecture
27616 HON 4260 Smr:Study Abroad:Today's Paris
Lecture
29068 HON 4260 Smr: Intro Chinese Linguistics
Lecture
29082 HON 4260 Smr: Languages of Italy
Lecture
29091 HON 4260 Smr: Modern Israeli Culture
Lecture
29094 HON 4260 Smr: WorldofEarlyChristianity
Lecture
29108 HON 4260 Smr: Medea in Afr Amer Lit
Lecture
29176 HON 4260 Smr:Lit., Art & Song of Gulag
Lecture
29036 HON 4280 Smr:History of Film Music
Lecture
29067 HON 4280 Smr:Soc Affects of New Tech
Lecture
29107 HON 4280 Smr: Health Care at the VA
Lecture
23437 HON 4930 Detroit Fellows Tutoring Project
Clinic
22739 HON 4930 Detroit Fellows Tutoring Project
Clinic
24401 HON 4940 Service-Learning Internship
Internship
28324 HON 4970 BStart Seminar
Seminar
22635 HON 4980 University Scholars Seminar
Seminar
21247 HON 4990 Honors Directed Study
Individual
21248 HON 4998 University Honors Thesis
Individual
28723 JPN 1010 Ele Japnse 1-HONORS
Lecture
29183 LAT 1020 Elementry Latin 2-HONORS
Lecture
29213 LIN 1860 Hon Int Symb Lgic-Honors
Lecture
23681 LIN 5993 Wrtg-Intnsv:LIN - Honors
Individual
20758 MAT 2010 Calculus 1-Honors
Lecture
21146 MAT 2010 Calculus 1-Honors
Lecture
21730 MAT 2020 Calculus 2-Honors
Lecture
22336 MAT 2020 Calculus 2-Honors
Lecture
23933 MAT 4990 Directed Study: Honors Program
Individual
20124 MAT 4990 Directed Study: Honors Program
Individual
23904 NE 2060 Hebrew/Israeli Film-HONORS
Lecture
28788 NFS 3230 Human Nutrition-HONORS
Lecture
28789 NFS 3230 Human Nutrition-Honors
Lecture
20242 NFS 5990 Honors Directed Study
Individual
28925 PHI 1500 Race, Sex & Religion-Honors
Lecture
28922 PHI 2140 Ancient Greek Med&Psych-Honors
Lecture
27704 PHI 2360 Feminist Philosophy-Honors
Lecture
29214 PHI 2860 Hon Int Symb Lgic-Honors
Lecture
21144 PHI 4890 Honors Thesis
Individual
28962 POL 2710 Survey Polish Culture-Honors
Lecture
29075 PS 1010 American Govt-Honors
Lecture
29030 PS 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-HONORS
Lecture
29080 PS 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-Honors
Lecture
24011 PS 3991 Dir Studies: WSU-Salford-HON
Individual
20612 PS 4995 Senior Honors Paper
Individual
20055 PSY 4991 Honors Directed Study
Individual
21487 PSY 4998 Senr Thesis Seminar-Honors
Individual
24753 PSY 5020 Honors Research in Psychology
Lecture
25973 PH 4150 Public Health Practicum-HONORS
Internship
27606 PH 5100 Capstone Course in PH-Honors
Lecture
28467 SW 1010 Intro To SW & Wlfr-HONORS
Lecture
27480 SOC 1010 Understanding Human Scty-HON
Lecture
27482 SOC 1010 Understanding Human Scty-HONOR
Lecture
28980 SOC 2300 Social Inequality-Honors
Lecture
27486 SOC 3050 Basic Soc Theory-HONORS
Lecture
28957 SOC 3200 Mthds: Social Research-HONORS
Lecture
28960 SOC 3220 Intro to Social Statistics-HON
Combined Lab/Lecture
28956 SOC 3220 Intro to Social Statistics-HON
Combined Lab/Lecture
28958 SOC 4204 Smr: Aging & Life Course-HONOR
Seminar
29006 SOC 4205 Smr: Medical Sociology-Honors
Seminar
27481 SOC 4996 Sociology Capstone-HONORS
Lecture
29215 SOC 4999 Sociology Honors Thesis
Individual
22538 SPA 2010 Intermediate Spanish-Honors
Lecture
22418 SLP 4998 Honors Seminar
Individual
28275 THR 4998 Capstone Honors Thesis
Individual
29025 US 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-HONORS
Lecture
29078 US 2000 Intro: Urban Studies-Honors
Lecture

WINTER 2020 Foundational Seminars

 

ANT 3410: Global Health --Jonathan Stillo

CRN 28603   Thursday 5:30-8:00pm     GL, SI                            

This honors seminar takes a holistic, biosocial approach to global health. We will look at the biological as well as social aspects of disease and disorder paying special attention to the social, economic, political and cultural factors that both cause disease and hinder its management. This will be accomplished by focusing on, health inequalities between and within wealthy and resource-constrained settings, how health systems are funded, the globalization of pharmaceuticals and clinical trials, the role of international and local development and civil society organizations, the effects of migration (whether routine or due to conflict/disaster) and how human rights concepts and laws impact (or not) people's health. Special attention will be paid to anti-microbial resistant infections (AMR) and neglected tropical diseases. This course is particularly appropriate for pre-health majors as well as public health, and social sciences.

 

ENG 3020: Community Cartographies: Community Engagement, New Media, and the Composition of Space (2 sections)--Christopher Susak      

CRN 24188  Tuesday/Thursday 10:00am - 11:15am         ICN

CRN 25781  Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am - 12:45pm        ICN                                      

In this section of ENG3020, we will explore how technical, cartographic, and other digital forms of writing can help "give data empathy" in community engagement scenarios (Hill 2015). Students work as interns (not volunteers) with the Brightmoor Artisans Collective (BAC), a non-profit community center where community members can safely and creatively work and learn together to process, market and consume affordable and healthy food using a holistic, wellness-based approach. Course topics include community-based research and writing methodologies; technical and professional communication strategies, multimedia composing; big data and radical geography; gentrification, white-knighting, writing across differences; and the ethics of community engagement. Requires 20 hours of off-site work (at BAC) roughly between weeks 6 and 14.

 

HON 2000: Doing Well and Doing Good? - Aaron Martin

CRN 28875 Monday/Wednesday 10:00am - 11:15am       SI, CI

This seminar explores the related ideas of doing well and doing good—and whether or not both can be done at the same time. In short, we'll be investigating the politics surrounding becoming successful and being charitable in the U.S. In doing so, you'll learn about what shapes our understanding of these terms and concepts. To that end, we'll discuss how much "volunteering" really helps solve structural problems. So, if you've ever asked yourself, "Have I even made a difference?" or, "How can I make a real difference?" come find out about how you can be successful at creating meaningful,  lasting positive change—for yourself and others.

 

HON 2000: Food in America - Aaron Martin

CRN 28877 Monday/Wednesday 11:30am - 12:45pm       SI, CI

If kids hate eating broccoli, but kids need their veggies to be healthy, and where kids love pizza, then let's just make pizza a vegetable so they'll be healthy, right!? (Yes, we did that.) This seminar introduces analytical tools to identify and evaluate various discursive points at which food narratives and cultural politics intersect in society and within research programs—ones like engineering, health sciences, anthropology, and, well, yours. By semester's end, you'll have learned about what informs people's relationship with food as well as how institutional processes shape—and, at the same time, are shaped by—food habits.

 

HON 2000: Pop Goes the World: Global Freedom Movements and U.S. Popular Culture - Beth Fowler

CRN 28882 Tuesday/Thursday 10:00am - 11:15am          SI, CI

CRN 28883 Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am – 12:45pm         SI, CI

This seminar class will teach students to examine how American music, movies, television shows, dance, and fashion was used to challenge political and social systems in the United States, Europe, Central America, Asia, and Africa between the 1940s and 1980s. Topics include popular culture within the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and Third Worldist Decolonization movements. 

 

HON 2000: Race and Sports in the United States - Bryan R. Ellis

CRN 28878 Monday/Wednesday 11:30am – 12:45pm      SI, CI

CRN 28880 Monday/Wednesday 2:30pm – 3:45pm          SI, CI

In our everyday, common-sense consumption of cultural production, we view the market of sports as the toy department of human affairs. It is constructed as a site of leisure and enjoyment—as an escape from the real-world. Many Americans naively believe sports are apolitical and meritocratic. This course will move beyond the passive, leisure-faire understanding of sports toward a deeper appreciation of the sports milieu and market as a contested site where race is produced and reproduced. We will study the ever-present but latent social, economic, and political dimensions of sports. Upon completing this course, you will see sports anew.

 

HON 2000: Crime and Media - James Buccellato

CRN 28885 Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am – 12:45pm         SI, CI

This course seeks to explain the ways in which the various types of media, such as newspapers, magazines, movies, television, books, radio, the Internet, music, and video-games shape and influence our beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors regarding crime and criminal justice. It further investigates the cultural, historical, and political interactions between the construction of criminality, the operations of the criminal justice system, and the dynamics of mass media.

 

HON 2000: Gangs and Organized Crime - James Buccellato

CRN 28884 Tuesday/Thursday 2:30pm – 3:45pm            SI, CI

The course examines how the cultural, economic, and political processes of globalization facilitate transnational criminal networks. Students will conduct individual and collaborative research that analyzes and evaluates the past and present transformations of gangs and organized crime groups.  Furthermore, we will investigate the global problems emerging from these networks, such as human trafficking, money laundering, crimes against nature, the drug trade, cybercrimes and public corruption. 

 

HON 2000: Disagreement in Detroit - Soraya Saatchi

CRN 28876 Monday/Wednesday 10:00am – 11:15am         SI, CI

CRN 28881 Tuesday/Thursday 10am – 11:15am                 SI, CI

"We can agree to disagree." You've likely heard this statement or thought it yourself many times. We live in a period of great political, religious, cultural and economic divisions, when people hold very strong views and are not afraid to express them. How should we react to disagreement? What effect should it have on our own beliefs, especially our deeply held ones? We will examine these contentious epistemic questions and apply various theories to specific, current and popular disputes in Detroit--with the hope of arriving at (or coming close to) a method for reconciliation and compromise.

 

HON 2000: What Plagues Detroit? - Tim Moran

CRN 28879 Monday/Wednesday 2:30pm – 3:45pm          SI, CI

CRN 28886 Tuesday/Thursday 2:30pm – 3:45pm            SI, CI

A history overview of the city's development with a focus on response to epidemic disease, public services, and public health, this seminar will explore the shaping of the city as a response to biological events, resource constraints, and social and medical advances. We will consider the city's cultural and structural responses to traditional infectious disease outbreaks over time, and we will also examine factors that have affected the city through public health issues such as violence, criminalized activity, access to clean water, adjacency to pollution, and drug use.

 

NE 2060: Trends in Israeli Cinema—Edith Covenskey   

CRN 23904  Tuesday 2:30 pm – 5:00pm                 GL                            

This course traces the development of Hebrew/Israeli Cinema from the start of the 20th century to the present. The class presents major directors and their representative films in documentaries, fictional dramas, and those based on true stories. The themes studied in class include: The senselessness of war; Holocaust Survivors; Siege in a personal and collective way; The ills of bureaucracy, and more.

 

PHI 1500--Race, Sex, and Religion: Philosophy of Substance and Transition—Justin Sledge  

CRN 28925 Monday/Wednesday 10:00am - 11:15am     CI                                                                             

One of the longest standing philosophical puzzles concerns how exactly an entity can remain identical to itself while undergoing change or transition from one state to another.  This class will explore this puzzle at the level of social philosophy.  Specifically we will look at three difficult and probing issues:  The first will concern the transition in 'western civilization' from the religious hegemony of the pre-modern period to the tenuous triumph of secularism.  What are the arguments that propelled the separation of 'church and state' and do they still obtain today?  Is secularism even social progress?  Secondly, we will explore the relationship of gender and sexuality from the philosophical lens of metaphysics.  Is gender/sexuality an essence, a process, a role, etc.?  How might one's metaphysical commitments actually impact the ability to, for instance, transition from one gender to another?  Finally, we will explore the concept of race which, despite being rejected by biological science as non-existent, still retains enormous social reality.  What does it mean for a concept/entity to be socially constructed?  How can such 'fictions' have such power over our daily lives?

 

PHI 2360--Feminist Perspectives in Philosophy – Mark Wenzel

CRN 27704  Tuesday/Thursday 1:00pm - 2:15pm            CI

What are feminist perspectives in philosophy and how are they different from traditional perspectives? Since philosophers have the intellectual duty to identify distorting biases in their work as well as the work of others and correct them, feminist philosophers continue that tradition.

Why are there real differences between feminist philosophers regarding the nature of gender, sex, sexuality, sexual difference and their roles in the oppression of women? What value do these categories have such that they can help us understand, and undo, the oppression of women?

How do categories like class, race, disability, religion, (de)colonial / diasporic subjects, and ethnic identity also matter to the oppression of women?

To begin to explore those issues, we will take an international focus on developing a 'feminist without borders'. Decolonizing feminist perspectives to make them inclusive is the work of this course.

 

PS 1010: Introduction to American Government—Kevin Deegan-Krause

CRN 29075 Tuesday/Thursday 10:30am - 12:10pm         SI, CIV     

Learn how to make things better!  Politics has a bad reputation but the practice of politics is an essential human skill and when used well it is the best path to social change.  We will learn the basic concepts necessary for understanding American public opinion and public institutions but we will go much deeper. Through a combination of active discussion, critical reading, analytical writing, group work, community engagement and advocacy, we will come to understand our own political power and use it in practical ways.  We will ask "What's wrong?"—identifying social problems—"What works?"—identifying policy solutions—and "What wins?"—planning action to move our policies forward.


SOC 2300: Urban explorations: social (in)justice in Detroit —Michelle Jacobs

CRN 28980  Tuesday 11:30am-2:00pm      SI, DEI                                                                  

Using a sociological lens, students in this course will explore the theme of social justice in urban contexts.   We will investigate the historical roots and contemporary manifestations of urban inequalities and interrogate systems of privilege and oppression that perpetuate unequal access to resources for some urban residents. A complex array of urban issues like concentrated poverty, mass incarceration, and environmental justice will be covered. The course capitalizes on WSU's midtown location to engage with community organizers and organizations working for social justice in Detroit.

 

SW 1010--Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare-- Shantalea Johns

CRN 28467  Monday 2:30pm-5:00pm        DEI

This course explores issues of fairness and equality in economic, political and social systems, and teaches how to apply social justice principles to major social problems in everyday life.  Students attend out-of-the-classroom events on campus and in the community to learn from social workers and social justice leaders who are engaging in work with vulnerable and at-risk populations in Detroit. 

 

US 2000: Introduction to Urban Studies—Andrew Guinn

CRN 29078 Monday/Wednesday 12:30pm - 02:10pm      SI                     

Do you want to understand the emerging challenges and transformations that face Detroit and cities across the world? Through Introduction to Urban Studies, you will learn about Detroit's history, grow conversant in current issues in urban planning, and obtain real-world skills to conduct research about the place where you live.