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Research opportunities

Mentored research and creative projects

Research@Honors encourages our undergraduate Honors students to engage in mentored research and creative projects. In pursuit of this mission, we are currently working with Wayne State faculty to identify existing or upcoming opportunities for our students to engage in quality research projects. Browse the projects listed below to see if a faculty member's project fits your interests, and continue to check this page for updates. Please only contact faculty members about the listed projects if you meet the required qualifications they have described.

If you are a faculty member at Wayne State and are planning or currently working on a research or creative project, please let us know how our students might get involved by completing this form: Faculty form

Current Opportunities

Fungal Communication via Extracellular RNA

Faculty Member: Dr. Robert Akins

Email: rakins@med.wayne.edu
Department: BMB

Project Description: Project testing the hypothesis that Candida and other fungi send exRNA signals to other populations to prepare them for pending stress.

Project Duration: 12/19/16 - 1/1/18

Desired number of student researchers: 2-3

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters and more

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 5 and 10 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Culturing yeasts under stress conditions, isolating RNA from cultures and supernatants, purifying vesicular fractions, fluorometric assays, scanning EM, practice analysis, performing RT-qPCR, data analysis.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: General lab skills, pipetting, microscope use, etc., is helpful. Will train eager newcomers. Self-motivated, meticulous, desire to discover.

To be considered: Email rakins@med.wayne.edu with GPA, Average hours available per week, and courses taken to date in BIO or CHEM.

 

Potential triggers of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer

Faculty Member: Dr. Robert Akins

Email: rakins@med.wayne.edu
Department: BMB

Project Description: Project tests the hypothesis that vaginal microbial species or groups foster infection by HPV or the progression from infection to cervical cancer.

Project Duration: 12/9/16 - 1/1/18

Desired number of student researchers: 2-3

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters and more

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 5 and 10 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Testing samples by qPCR, data analysis.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Will train, but general lab skills and desire to discover, self-motivated, meticulous.

To be considered: Email rakins@med.wayne.edu with GPA, Average hours available per week, and courses taken to date in BIO or CHEM.

 

Nanomedicines for Cancer

Faculty Member: Joshua Reineke
Email: reineke@wayne.edu
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences

 

Project Description: There are a few active projects in my lab in the area of nanomedicines for cancer: 1) lymph-targeted pulmonary delivery systems for the prevention and treatment of metastasis, 2) novel micelle formulations for pancreatic cancer, and 3) mathematical modeling and pharmacokinetic analysis of nanoparticles for targeted delivery. 

Project Duration: ongoing starting ASAP

 

Desired number of student researchers: max of 2

Expected duration of student commitment: Between one semester and one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 10 and 15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: First week or two will consist of shadowing and orientation to the lab. From there students will be paired with a graduate student or postdoc to assist in nanoparticle fabrication, characterization, cell culture studies, etc.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Friendly personality, detail oriented and proactive

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Basic chemistry (organic and inorganic), programming experience, cell culture understanding, immunology, and cancer biology. However, applicants without this experience, but with an interest in some of these areas are encouraged.

Other important information: Located in the Pharmacy building. Students must be willing to come to the medical campus for all lab work.

 

Formative student experience in a lecture format class

Faculty Member: Joshua Reineke
Email: reineke@wayne.edu
Department: Education

 

Project Description: Novel teaching techniques and assessments will be evaluated for application in large lecture format classroom environment.

Project Duration: ongoing starting 08/26/13

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-3

Expected duration of student commitment: One semester

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Assisting in the preparation of lecture materials, collecting of surveys, assessment of survey data.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: High ethical standards, interest in education, detail oriented, courteous and patient personality.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Interest in life sciences and physical sciences, good writing skills

Other important information: Project is located in the Pharmacy building. Students must be willing to travel to medical campus to work on the project. Students will need to commit to some specific dates/times due to the nature of the project.

 

Baby on Board! WSU Early Parenting Study

Faculty Member: Dr. Carolyn Dayton
Email: cu4385@wayne.edu
Department: Social Work & Merrill Palmer

 

Project Description: This study will investigate the ways in which mothers and fathers in high risk contexts are psychologically approaching their preparation for parenting a new baby and the ways in which their biology and physiology influence their early parenting behaviors (pregnancy and early infancy). Data collection will include parental measures of physiological functioning (salivary cortisol, respiratory sinus arrhythmia), psychological (psychopathology, resilience) and contextual factors (violence and trauma exposure). Parental data will be collected in a developmental laboratory at the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute when mothers are pregnant. Parent and infant data will subsequently be collected at the same lab when infants are 4 months of age.

Project Duration: ongoing

 

Desired number of student researchers: 20

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 5 and 10 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Assist in recruitment activities at Detroit OB clinics. Assist with the running of family laboratory sessions.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Eligible undergraduate students must have an interest in this area of research and demonstrate the ability to conduct oneself in a respectful and professional manner with vulnerable families. The ability to work independently and as a member of the larger research team is critical. GPA of 3.5 or above is preferred as is prior experience working with vulnerable children or families. Students must commit to working a minimum of 6 hours per week for two terms.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Interest and/or experience in the area of Developmental Psychology, Clinical Psychology and/or Family Social Work.

Other important information: Options for qualified students are available to conduct a supervised directed study (for a grade) and to work with Dr. Dayton on an honor's thesis.

 

Chromatin Structure and Gene Regulation

Faculty Member: Dr. Lori Pile
Email: loripile@wayne.edu
Department: Biological Studies

 

Project Description: Our laboratory uses the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to study the role of chromatin in the regulation of gene expression. Students generally work in the area of genetics or molecular biology to address fundamental questions regarding gene regulation, cell proliferation and development. 

Project Duration: ongoing

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-2 per semester

Expected duration of student commitment: Between one semester and one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 15 and 20 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Undergraduate researchers generally conduct experiments under the direction of a research technician or graduate students. Specific experiments will be designed for each inpidual. Experiments include set up and analysis of fly genetic cross as well as carrying out molecular and cell biological studies. Students are expected to keep clear, up to date scientific notebooks and may be asked to present their research at lab meeting upon completion of the project.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Honors genetics is preferred but not necessary.

 

Respiratory Plasticity in spinal cord injured mice

Faculty Member: Dr. Jason Mateika
Email: jmateika@med.wayne.edu

Phone: 313 576-4481
Department: Physiology

 

Project Description: We are exploring whether exposure to intermittent periods of hypoxia induces respiratory plasticity via release of the neuromodulator serotonin.  We are also exploring if respiratory plasticity promotes recovery of respiratory muscle function in spinal cord injured animals.

Project Duration: ongoing

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: One academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Greater than 20 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: 1) monitor and care for mice, 2) complete surgical procedures on mice, 3) data collection, 4) data analysis, 5) poster preparation

Required skills, coursework, or experience: 1) An undergraduate biology major, 2) Interested in graduate work or medical school, 3) Sophomore or junior with a 3.7 or greater GPA, 4) Interested in pursuing the project for an extended period of time (i.e. 1 year or longer)

 

Evolutionary and conservation genetics of freshwater fishes

Faculty Member: Thomas Dowling
Email: cx9077@wayne.edu
Department: Biological sciences

 

Project Description: We utilize a variety of molecular methods (DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites) to understand how biopersity is generated and maintained. Fishes are used as a model system because of a variety of characteristics.

Project Duration: 02/01/2014 - 12/31/2018

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: Longer than two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 10 and 15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: General lab tasks, DNA extraction, amplification, sequencing, genetic characterization

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Basic experience in biology laboratory

 

Past Opportunities

Estradiol's effects on the placenta

Faculty Member: Dr. Debra Skafar
Email: aa2269@wayne.edu
Department: Physiology(students from other departments with relevant experience welcome)

Project Description: Although estradiol is necessary for a healthy placenta, too much too soon triggers cell death, which can lead to preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. We are investigating the mechanism through which estradiol can exert its effects, hopefully leading to better outcomes.

Project Duration: 05/01/15 - 06/01/2016

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-2

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 10 and 15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Students will work in conjunction with Dr. Randy Armant's lab to learn, and then carry out in my lab, cell culture, TUNEL assay, cell proliferation assay, immunohistochemistry, PCR and westerns.  

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Basic biology and chemistry courses are essential, preferably those having a laboratory component. Willingness to learn is essential.

Other important information: Experience designing, carrying out, and interpreting experiments would be useful. Dr. Skafar is looking for a self-starter who is both capable and likes science. Her previous student is finishing up two manuscripts. 

To be considered, please request a faculty member, preferably from Science class, send a letter of reference to Dr. Skafar recommending you as a prospective student researcher.

 

No Texting While Driving in the Motor City

Faculty Member: Randall Commissaris, PhD
Email: Commissaris@wayne.edu
Department: Pharmaceutical Sciences/ Public Health; Driving Safety

 

Project Description: Students would work on a project using the human driving simulator, located in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Studies currently focus on distracted driving associate with cell phone use and/or texting. Future studies will examine the effects of OTC and Prescription drugs on driving behavior.

Project Duration: 04/01/2012 - 06/30/2016

 

Desired number of student researchers: 2

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 10 and 15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Assist Dr Commissaris in recruiting subjects, executing the experiment and analyzing the data.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Strong in math (thru calculus); good interpersonal skills; problem solving skills; good skills with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and other Office programs (Word, PPT); good communication skills.

 

Foster care and higher education: Transition to Independence program

Faculty Member: Dr. Angelique Day
Email: ew6080@wayne.edu
Department: social work, child welfare, college access, adolescence

 

Project Description: Researchers have only recently begun to explore why so few former foster youth who attend college graduate with a degree. This study proposes to track a cohort of former wards of the court enrolled at Wayne State University via administrative and survey level data to address this critical gap in the knowledge base. This pilot study will be used to provide the Michigan Department of Human Services with preliminary evidence related to the use of targeted student support services with foster care youth to inform policy and practice. OBJECTIVES • This study is a longitudinal study that uses a cohort model to track students who enroll at WSU from the foster care system from the point of enrollment to the time the student graduates, transfers, or drops out. The objective is to assess the impact of WSU’s pilot program, Transition to Independence Program, a program designed to recruit and retain foster care youth in a post-secondary training program at Wayne State University. • Provide insight to staff of the WSU foster care and higher education program on what they can do to better meet the needs of the students they are serving • Provide evaluation results to the Michigan Department of Human Services to draw down subsequent funding for program sustainability

Project Duration: 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2015

 

Desired number of student researchers: 2

Expected duration of student commitment: two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 5 and 10 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: phone calls to participants to conduct survey research over the phone email reminders to research participants to complete surveys participation in organizing focus groups, transcription of focus group data

Required skills, coursework, or experience: interest in social sciences or education research, Can train if student is committed

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: education, political science, sociology, psychology, or social work majors preferred

 

Algiers Motel Murders/Detroit Riot 1967

Faculty Member: Dr. Danielle McGuire
Email: dmcguire13@gmail.com
Department: History

 

Project Description: I am in the process of investigating the murder of three young African American men in the summer of 1967 in Detroit. They were at a hotel while the riot raged around them and in the middle of the night, Detroit Police officers, State Police and members of the National Guard raided the hotel because they heard a report of sniper fire in the area. A brutal confrontation between the hotel's guests and the authorities ensued and three young men were killed. There were at least three trials, but no one was ever convicted for killing Carl Cooper, Aubrey Pollard, and Fred Temple. In the wake of the officers' acquittal, African Americans in Detroit were furious and felt that the case had been "whitewashed." Many feared more violence. The case was a major historical milestone in Detroit's history and offers a window into the tumultuous period before, during and after the '67 riots.

Project Duration:04/01/2013 - 12/31/2015

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-4

Expected duration of student commitment: Between one semester and one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 2-5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Students interested in working on this project would do archival research, oral history, and learn how to gather information from places that do not like to give information away (municipal offices, police departments etc. For example, students will submit FOIA requests and follow-up). Once all the evidence is gathered, students will learn how to take the "raw material" of history and write a narrative-driven account of the past. (Learning the art and science of writing history)

Required skills, coursework, or experience: History coursework; experience doing primary and secondary research in the library and archive; familiarity with JSTOR and other online databases; familiarity with WORLDCAT and online finding sources.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Ideally, a student would have taken HIS 3140 and HIS 3150 (African American history); but any mid to upper level history course would suffice. Advanced Journalism students would be good, too.
Students need to be self-starters and creative thinkers and must be comfortable working in the library; know how to order and use microfilm; and know how to navigate archival libraries. I am happy to help with some of this.

Other important information:Students must be passionate about finding relevant material; be able to sit in the library for extended periods of time; and be comfortable talking with people about their experiences with the 1967 Detroit riot.

 

Molecular Invasive Species Research

Faculty Member: Dr. Jeffrey Ram
Email: aa2234@wayne.edu (Include in the subject line: "Student Research Inquiry")
Department: Great Lakes Protection

 

Project Description: We have several funded projects that analyze Great Lakes ships, waters and sediments for non-native organisms that may damage the ecology of the Great Lakes.  Students are generally given their own research projects that are integral parts of the overall research program.  About half of all undergraduate students have contributed sufficiently to our research projects that they become co-authors on the laboratory's publications.  They also get opportunities to attend scientific conferences when their projects merit public presentation.

Project Duration: on-going through 2015

 

Desired number of student researchers: 2 more could be accommodated

Expected duration of student commitment: Longer than one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 10-15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: We try to fit the project to the student's skills and interests.  We train students in needed techniques (e.g., PCR, sequencing, bioinformatics, and computer programming are large parts of our current work).

Required skills, coursework, or experience: minimum GPA of 3.0

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Varies with the student.  What is most important is that the student is very smart, learns quickly, has enough time to devote to the project, and is motivated by more than getting "another line" on his or her c.v.

 

Representing Panama, 1800-1914

Faculty Member: Robert Aguirre
Email: ad6161@wayne.edu
Department: English (students from other departments welcome)

Project Description: A study of the history of British and American writing and pictorial imaging of the area now known as the Panama Canal. Before the Canal examines the history and literature of the place in the immediate aftermath of the gold rush in 1849, when thousands of miners and travelers flocked to the isthmus seeking a quick passage to California instead of taking the long route around Cape Horn. The project deals with the history of travel, US history, poetry, letter writing, and transportation and globalization.

Project Duration: 01/01/2013 - 06/01/2013

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-2

Expected duration of student commitment: One semester

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Conduct library research using electronic databases; locate primary materials in archives and libraries beyond Detroit, using specialized finding aids; summarize articles and book chapters; develop annotated bibliographies. 

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Basic familiarity with the WSU library; experience using MS Word; good writing and oral communication skills; good organization skills; analytic and curious mind.

Other important information: This is a humanities project, but social scientists and/or students with a strong interest in history and language are welcome, whatever their major. You will learn valuable research skills that will serve you well no matter what you plan to study or do. 

 

Focus HOPE Neighborhood Network Initiative

Faculty Member: Dr. Joanne Sobeck
Email: ab1350@wayne.edu
Department: Social Work

 

Project Description: Project aims to provide technical assistance, research and support to build capacity and evaluate the outcomes of an initiative targeting a 100 block area of Detroit. Nine member agencies are working together to build self sufficiency of residents through innovative service delivery mechanisms. 

Project Duration: 6/30/12 - 9/30/14

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-2

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: -Conduct literature review and summarize information on innovative delivery mechanisms -Assist with gathering data to document process outcomes (observation meetings, focus groups, interviews) -Assist with development of program materials (intervention manual, marketing materials) -Assist with report writing and other dissemination strategies

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Ability to summarize research articles; good writing skills; knowledge of qualitative research methods (intro research methods course)

 

In the Courts of Revolution: Violence, Legality, and Social Control in the Rural Soviet Courts, 1917-1939

Faculty Member: Prof. Aaron Retish
Email: aretish@wayne.edu
Department: History

 

Project Description: A study of local courts in the Soviet countryside.

Project Duration: 03/25/2013 - 12/12/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-3

Expected duration of student commitment: One semester

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 2-5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: reading Soviet legal journals, copying them, library research

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Needs to be able to read Russian. Heritage or advanced language skills necessary.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: some Russian and Soviet history.  If a student knows a Central Asian language--Kazakh, Turkmen, Gerogian, Armenian, etc. that would be great.

 

Women in Science

Faculty Member: Dr. Marsha Richmond
Email: marsha.richmond@wayne.edu

Phone: 734-277-2421
Department: History/History of Science

 

Project Description: I am working with a colleague at the Colorado School of Mines on a project to publish circa three volumes of British and American women's primary writing on scientific topics between c. 1830 and 1930. The publisher is Pickering & Chatto. One of the aims of the project, in addition to making available primary materials that are not easily accessible, is to document the changes in women's participation in the sciences after the opening to them of higher education, and hence formal scientific training. I am in the early stages of identifying women whose work in science is reasonably substantial, attempting to collect their publications, and provide biographical information that will be included in the Introduction to their papers.  I would welcome assistance with the process, and the student would be so acknowledged in the publication. 

Project Duration: 03/26/2013 - 04/30/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-3

Expected duration of student commitment: Between one semester and one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 2-5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Students would be given a list of women who worked in biology (my particular area of study) and would go through their publications to see which ones are available at WSU (either electronic or paper).  If no electronic copy is available, students would photocopy the journal pages so that they can be scanned.  They would also look for existing biographical information on the inpidual.  Students could also look through existing biographical dictionaries of Women in Science to identify women in disciplines other than biology that might be included in the volume.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Familiarity with science is helpful but not essential.  Interest in the history of women is desirable, as well as basic bibliographic and research skills.

Other important information: Student contributions to the research effort of this project will be suitably recognized in the publication's Acknowledgements.

 

Ethnic Identity and Values

Faculty Member: Dr. John Brender
Email: brenderj@wayne.edu

Phone: 313-577-3035
Department: Cultural Anthropology

 

Project Description: I am looking for students interested in researching how college students from a given ethnic group perceive the institutions and values of their home and host cultures. Target groups may include first or second generation immigrants as well as generation 1.5.

Project Duration: 04/15/2013 - 04/15/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-4

Expected duration of student commitment: Between one semester and one academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 2-5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: IRB approval and compliance, Review of literature, Interviews and discussion of interviewing techniques, Transcription, Analysis, Writing, Presenting, Publishing

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Enthusiasm, dedication and an interest in presenting and publishing

Other important information: I can help students learn all facets of qualitative research, but require 1 hour per week meeting time.

 

Development of Transgenic Dioecious Plant Populations

Faculty Member: Dr. Edward M. Golenberg
Email: egolenb@biology.biosci.wayne.edu

Phone: 313-577-2888
Department: Biological Sciences

 

Project Description: Initially we will develop transgenic Arabidopsis that are exclusively functional males or females.  We will further test functional domains of one of our target proteins.  We will test efficiencies with tissue specific promoters.  We can anticipate expanding this work to additional species. 

Project Duration: 05/01/2013 - 04/30/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: One academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 10-15 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Students will be directly supervised and instructed by Dr. Golenberg.  Students will be expected to construct designed clones, screen clones, transform E. col and Agrobacterium tumifaciens.  Students will be responsible for planting and plant maintenance.  Students will learn plant transformation methods including selection and screening.  Students will be responsible for documenting all experimental procedures and documenting results.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: BIO 1500, BIO 1510, BIO2200, BIO 2600. Enough chemistry to be able to make solutions (understand molarity, etc.)

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Genetics. Some lab experience. Must be reliable and motivated.

Other important information: I am not interested in a student who simply wants a bullet point on his/her resume.

 

Inbreeding depression and the degree of relatedness

Faculty Member: Dr. Carl Freeman
Email: ad5728@wayne.edu
Department: Biology

 

Project Description: This project is being done in conjunction with Dr. Edward Golenberg. The project involves crossing spinach varieties to make first generation hybrids. We will then cross these hybrids to make families and create crosses of various degrees of relatedness and then measure the fitness of inpiduals as a function of their degree of relatedness. Finally, the student will learn how to find molecular genetic markers which we will use to confirm the degree of relatedness.

Project Duration: 05/01/2013 - 05/31/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-2

Expected duration of student commitment: One academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: 2-5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: The student will be responsible for maintaining the plants, crossing the plants, and identifying the genetic markers, under the direction of Dr. Golenberg.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Genetics--BIO 3070 would be very helpful.Maturity, careful record keeping; good eye hand coordination

Other important information: We intend to publish this work and if the student is careful and dependable, they will be an author.

 

Wireless sensing and control networking

Faculty Member: Prof. Hongwei Zhang
Email: bb3692@wayne.edu

Phone: 313-577-0731
Department: Computer Science/Wireless Networking

Contact instructions: Please check out information about our research at the website http://www.cs.wayne.edu/~hzhang/ and http://www.cs.wayne.edu/~hzhang/group/projects.html. If you are interested in our research, please feel free to contact me or my students.

 

Project Description: Investigate transformative solutions to predictable, real-time wireless networking solutions that are foundations of many domains of national priority such as smart transportation, smart grid, and advanced manufacturing.

Project Duration: 08/01/2013 - 07/30/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 5 and 10 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Research and programming.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Computer networking, computer programming.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Embedded networks and programming.

 

Social media and neighborhood change

Faculty Member: Richard Smith
Email: eo8093@wayne.edu
Department: Social Work

 

Project Description: Develop a pilot system to geocode social media output (e.g. Twitter, Foursquare) to track neighborhood change.

Project Duration: 08/17/2013 - 04/31/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 3

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Develop list of relevant hashtags consistent with the neighborhood change literature. Write a program to analyze the Twitter firehose or search API, extract geotagged hashtags relevant to neighborhood change, and display on a map.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Programming in Python or Ruby. Knowledge of R. Some social science coursework on urban neighborhoods.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Web (HTML5) and mobile app development for Android.

Other important information: This is a brainstorm that might not go anywhere.

 

Understanding the Fast Genomic Changes in Bacterial Pathogen Neisseria meningitidis

Faculty Member: Dr. Weilong Hao
Email: ex8688@wayne.edu
Department: Biological Sciences

 

Project Description: Bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis change rapidly featuring quickly developing antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape. We are interested in understanding the genomics changes in these sometime deadly bugs.

Project Duration: 8/28/2013 - 4/28/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 2

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 15 and 20 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: To compare a large number of bacterial pathogen genomes and identify the important features linked to virulence and epidemiology.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Solid background in Genetics. Not afraid of math and computers.

 

Genomics of yeast mitochondria and aging

Faculty Member: Dr. Weilong Hao
Email: ex8688@wayne.edu
Department: Biological Sciences

 

Project Description: Understanding the fast genomic changes in yeast mitochondria and their consequences in aging

Project Duration: 8/28/2013 - 4/28/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 2

Expected duration of student commitment: Two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 15 and 20 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: Compare genomic changes in yeast mitochondria and their consequences in aging.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Solid background in Genetics, PCR experience is required.

 

Viral-host interaction of genetically manipulated herpes simplex virus

Faculty Member: Dr. Haidong Gu
Email: ex3288@wayne.edu
Phone: 313-577-6402

Department: Department of Biological Sciences

 

Project Description: We construct recombinant HSV-1 and study the functional impact of mutated viral genes.

Project Duration: 08/28/2013 - 04/29/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: two semesters

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 15 and 20 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: glassware cleaning, medium and buffer preparation, autoclave, DNA extraction, restriction digestion, gel electrophoresis, etc.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: BIO2200, BIO3070

 

Emotional Labor Strategies Among Restaurant Servers

Faculty Member: Dr. Zachary Brewster
Email: ew0201@wayne.edu
Department: Sociology

 

Project Description: This study assesses the nature of emotional labor strategies used by restaurant servers  

Project Duration: 09/01/2013 - 12/20/2013

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1-5

Expected duration of student commitment: One semester

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: I am seeking a motivated undergraduate student who is also a server in a full-service restaurant. The student would be asked to collect data for the project while working as a restaurant server. In the event that the student(s) is motivated and interested I'd be open to bringing him/her/them on as co-authors of the resultant manuscript.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Required Characteristics: Integrity

Other important information: I am seeking students who wait tables in a full-service restaurant.

 

Comparative grammar project: the minority languages of Southern China

Faculty Member: Prof. Martha Ratliff
Email: ac6000@wayne.edu
Department: Linguistics Program

 

Project Description: The bulk of the field work on the minority languages of southern China has been conducted by Chinese scholars. In order to understand historical developments in these languages, one must use grammars and language sketches written in Chinese.  

Project Duration: 9/1/2013 - 4/30/2014

 

Desired number of student researchers: 1

Expected duration of student commitment: One academic year

Expected weekly time commitment of undergraduate researcher: Between 2 and 5 hours per week

Description to tasks to be completed by undergraduate student researcher: The student researcher will be translating academic articles written in Chinese into English.  They will also do preliminary comparison/analysis of particular grammatical features across languages: negation, question formation, comparison, etc.

Required skills, coursework, or experience: Native knowledge of Chinese; ability to read academic articles in Chinese.

Preferred skills, coursework, or experience: Interest in languages.